International Conference on Thinking

welcome

22-25 July, 2020

Hôtel de Ville de Paris (Paris City Hall)

3/5, rue de Lobau, 75004 Paris, France

The International Conference on Thinking is back in Europe!

…for the 1st time in PARIS, France!

The 9th International Conference on Thinking, ICT-2020, will be held in the beautiful capital of France: Paris, within the historic Hôtel de Ville, between the 22nd and the 25th of July, 2020. We encourage researchers from all around the world and from all disciplines to submit their best work about how people think and to meet in the City of Lights for four full days of intense scientific discussions.

It will cover the most recent international research on thinking and reasoning in cognitive psychology, cognitive science, judgment and decision making, and philosophy. This will be the first time that the conference is held in France, even though France has made fundamental contributions to the study of thinking and reasoning, since Descartes and Port-Royal Logic to the present day. The most recent developments in the field are based on probability theory and apply principles that go back to Pascal and Laplace.

Organized by:

Logo FEDERATION - RVB

Aim & Scope

Understanding of human thought processes:

  • Rationality
  • Morality
  • Studies on reasoning
  • Decision-making
  • Problem-solving

Topics

  • Reasoning, either deductive, inductive, abductive, causal…
  • Judgments of probabilities and other quantities
  • Conceptual thinking
  • Neuropsychology of reasoning
  • Influence of language and culture on thought
  • Belief revision
  • Thinking and disabilities
  • And others…
a-beaming-smile-for-you

keynotes-seniors

Keynotes seniors

Steve Sloman

Steve Sloman

Senior

Steven Sloman is professor of Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences at Brown, where he has worked since 1992. He is ex-Editor-in-Chief of the journal Cognition. Steven is a cognitive scientist who studies how people think. He has studied how our habits of thought influence the way we see the world, how the different systems that constitute thought interact to produce conclusions, conflict, and conversation, and how our construal of how the world works influences how we evaluate events and decide what actions to take. In 2005, he published the book Causal Models: How We Think About the World and Its Alternatives with Oxford University Press. In 2017, he and Phil Fernbach published The Knowledge Illusion: Why We Never Think Alone (Riverhead Press).
https://sites.google.com/site/slomanlab/

Joshua Greene

Joshua Greene

Senior

Joshua D. Greene is Professor of Psychology and a member of the Center for Brain Science faculty at Harvard University. His research interests cluster around the intersection of philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience. His early work focused on the cognitive neuroscience of moral judgment and the interplay between emotion and reason in moral dilemmas. More recent work focuses on critical features of individual and collective intelligence. His current neuroscientific research examines how the brain combines concepts to form thoughts and how thoughts are manipulated in reasoning and imagination. His current behavioral research examines strategies for improved social decision making and the alleviation of intergroup conflict. Other interests include effective altruism and the social implications of advancing artificial intelligence. He is the author of Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them.

Tania Lombrozo

Tania Lombrozo

Senior

Tania Lombrozo is a Professor of Psychology at Princeton University, as well as an Associate of the Department of Philosophy and the University Center for Human Values. She received her Ph.D. in Psy-chology from Harvard University in 2006 after receiving a B.S. in Symbolic Systems and a B.A. in Philosophy from Stanford University. Dr. Lombrozo’s research aims to address foundational ques-tions about cognition using the empirical tools of cognitive psychology and the conceptual tools of analytic philosophy. Her work focuses on explanation and understanding, social cognition, causal reasoning, and folk epistemology. She is the recipient of numerous early-career awards including the Stanton Prize from the Society for Philosophy and Psychology, the Spence Award from the Association for Psychological Science, a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation, and a James S. McDonnell Foundation Scholar Award in Understanding Human Cognition.
https://cognition.princeton.edu/members

Maggie Toplak

Maggie Toplak

Senior

Dr. Maggie Toplak is an Associate Professor in the Clinical-Developmental Area of the Department of Psychology at York University and a Core Member of the LaMarsh Centre for Child and Youth Research. The focus of her research is on judgment, decision-making and rational thinking, including their associations with individual differences in cognitive abilities and performance-based measures of execu-tive function. Most recently, she has conducted a 9 year longitudinal study to examine the developmen-tal trajectories of these competencies. Her research has been informed by using participants across the lifespan and with special populations, including youth with ADHD, young offenders and pathological gamblers. She has co-authored two books, The Rationality Quotient (RQ): Toward a Test of Rational Thinking (with Keith E. Stanovich and Richard F. West) and Individual Differences in Judgment and Decision Making: A Developmental Perspective (with Joshua A. Weller). Her research has been funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), Canadian Institutes for Health Re-search (CIHR) and the Ontario Mental Health Foundation (OMHF).

Abigail Barr

Abigail Barr

Senior

Abigail Barr is a Professor in Economics at the University of Nottingham. Her research focuses on the socially embedded decision-maker. She has designed and implemented a variety of lab and lab-type experiments involving students in several countries, villagers in Zimbabwe, Colombia, Uganda, Nigeria, Sri Lanka, and Pakistan, private-sector waged workers and unemployed people in the UK, Chile, Peru, Ghana, South Africa, and Spain and health workers and teachers in Ethiopia, Uganda, and Albania. Four themes have dominated her work to date: the role of other-regarding preferences in individual decision-making; how people set up and hold each other to mutually beneficial agreements; citizens’ willingness and ability to hold public service providers to account; and the factors and mechanisms determining individual preferences and values.
https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/economics/people/abigail.barr

Steve Sloman

Steve Sloman

Senior

Steven Sloman is professor of Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences at Brown, where he has worked since 1992. He is ex-Editor-in-Chief of the journal Cognition. Steven is a cognitive scientist who studies how people think. He has studied how our habits of thought influence the way we see the world, how the different systems that constitute thought interact to produce conclusions, conflict, and conversation, and how our construal of how the world works influences how we evaluate events and decide what actions to take. In 2005, he published the book Causal Models: How We Think About the World and Its Alternatives with Oxford University Press. In 2017, he and Phil Fernbach published The Knowledge Illusion: Why We Never Think Alone (Riverhead Press).
https://sites.google.com/site/slomanlab/

Joshua Greene

Joshua Greene

Senior

Joshua D. Greene is Professor of Psychology and a member of the Center for Brain Science faculty at Harvard University. His research interests cluster around the intersection of philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience. His early work focused on the cognitive neuroscience of moral judgment and the interplay between emotion and reason in moral dilemmas. More recent work focuses on critical features of individual and collective intelligence. His current neuroscientific research examines how the brain combines concepts to form thoughts and how thoughts are manipulated in reasoning and imagination. His current behavioral research examines strategies for improved social decision making and the alleviation of intergroup conflict. Other interests include effective altruism and the social implications of advancing artificial intelligence. He is the author of Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them.

Tania Lombrozo

Tania Lombrozo

Senior

Tania Lombrozo is a Professor of Psychology at Princeton University, as well as an Associate of the Department of Philosophy and the University Center for Human Values. She received her Ph.D. in Psy-chology from Harvard University in 2006 after receiving a B.S. in Symbolic Systems and a B.A. in Philosophy from Stanford University. Dr. Lombrozo’s research aims to address foundational ques-tions about cognition using the empirical tools of cognitive psychology and the conceptual tools of analytic philosophy. Her work focuses on explanation and understanding, social cognition, causal reasoning, and folk epistemology. She is the recipient of numerous early-career awards including the Stanton Prize from the Society for Philosophy and Psychology, the Spence Award from the Association for Psychological Science, a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation, and a James S. McDonnell Foundation Scholar Award in Understanding Human Cognition.
https://cognition.princeton.edu/members

Maggie Toplak

Maggie Toplak

Senior

Dr. Maggie Toplak is an Associate Professor in the Clinical-Developmental Area of the Department of Psychology at York University and a Core Member of the LaMarsh Centre for Child and Youth Research. The focus of her research is on judgment, decision-making and rational thinking, including their associations with individual differences in cognitive abilities and performance-based measures of execu-tive function. Most recently, she has conducted a 9 year longitudinal study to examine the developmen-tal trajectories of these competencies. Her research has been informed by using participants across the lifespan and with special populations, including youth with ADHD, young offenders and pathological gamblers. She has co-authored two books, The Rationality Quotient (RQ): Toward a Test of Rational Thinking (with Keith E. Stanovich and Richard F. West) and Individual Differences in Judgment and Decision Making: A Developmental Perspective (with Joshua A. Weller). Her research has been funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), Canadian Institutes for Health Re-search (CIHR) and the Ontario Mental Health Foundation (OMHF).

Abigail Barr

Abigail Barr

Senior

Abigail Barr is a Professor in Economics at the University of Nottingham. Her research focuses on the socially embedded decision-maker. She has designed and implemented a variety of lab and lab-type experiments involving students in several countries, villagers in Zimbabwe, Colombia, Uganda, Nigeria, Sri Lanka, and Pakistan, private-sector waged workers and unemployed people in the UK, Chile, Peru, Ghana, South Africa, and Spain and health workers and teachers in Ethiopia, Uganda, and Albania. Four themes have dominated her work to date: the role of other-regarding preferences in individual decision-making; how people set up and hold each other to mutually beneficial agreements; citizens’ willingness and ability to hold public service providers to account; and the factors and mechanisms determining individual preferences and values.
https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/economics/people/abigail.barr

our-team

Early career keynotes

Gordon Pennycook

Gordon Pennycook

Junior

Gordon Pennycook is an Assistant Professor of Behavioural Science at the Hill/Levene Schools of Business and an Associate Member of the Department of Psychology at the University of Regina. He completed his PhD at the University of Waterloo in 2016 and was a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow at Yale University from 2016-2018. His expertise is on the cognitive psychology of thinking and reasoning with a focus on metacognition. His research has focused on topics such as religious and paranormal belief, morality, creativity, political ideology, and (most recently) fake news and misinformation (among others).
About

Nina Strohminger

Nina Strohminger

Junior

Nina Strohminger’s research approaches key questions in business ethics through the lens of psycholo-gy. She holds a B.A. in Cognitive Science from Brown University and a Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Michigan. She has held postdoctoral fellowships at Duke University and Yale University. She is an Assistant Professor of Legal Studies & Business Ethics at the University of Pennsylvania.
www.ninastrohminger.com

Henrik Singmann

Henrik Singmann

Junior

Henrik Singmann has received his PhD in 2014 in Freiburg (Germany). After 4 years as a postdoc at the University of Zurich, he has started as an assistant professor at the University of Warwick in October 2018. His main research interest are the cognitive processes underlying reasoning and memory. In both domains, he is working towards developing formal theories that are able to describe the computational processes on an individual level. In addition, he is interested in the development and implementation of computational methods and tools for psychology and other empirical disciplines.
http://singmann.org/

Kinga Morsanyi

Kinga Morsanyi

Junior

Kinga Morsanyi has a background in the development of reasoning skills in typical development and in special populations (in developmental dyscalculia and autism). She is particularly interested in reasoning heuristics, probabilistic reasoning, analogical reasoning, and how reasoning skills can be improved through training. Another line of her research concerns mathematical abilities and mathematical anxiety, and the contribution of reasoning skills to mathematics performance. She is also interested in how affec-tive states influence reasoning and maths abilities, as well as people’s decisions, and how reasoning and maths skills can be improved by training. Her work has been funded by grants from the ESRC, the Nuf-field Foundation, the Royal Society, the British Academy, and the Higher Education Academy Psychol-ogy Network.
https://pure.qub.ac.uk/portal/en/persons/kinga-morsanyi(898599ff-f105-44bc-ad3a-8194bb37c69b).html

Gordon Pennycook

Gordon Pennycook

Junior

Gordon Pennycook is an Assistant Professor of Behavioural Science at the Hill/Levene Schools of Business and an Associate Member of the Department of Psychology at the University of Regina. He completed his PhD at the University of Waterloo in 2016 and was a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow at Yale University from 2016-2018. His expertise is on the cognitive psychology of thinking and reasoning with a focus on metacognition. His research has focused on topics such as religious and paranormal belief, morality, creativity, political ideology, and (most recently) fake news and misinformation (among others).
About

Nina Strohminger

Nina Strohminger

Junior

Nina Strohminger’s research approaches key questions in business ethics through the lens of psycholo-gy. She holds a B.A. in Cognitive Science from Brown University and a Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Michigan. She has held postdoctoral fellowships at Duke University and Yale University. She is an Assistant Professor of Legal Studies & Business Ethics at the University of Pennsylvania.
www.ninastrohminger.com

Henrik Singmann

Henrik Singmann

Junior

Henrik Singmann has received his PhD in 2014 in Freiburg (Germany). After 4 years as a postdoc at the University of Zurich, he has started as an assistant professor at the University of Warwick in October 2018. His main research interest are the cognitive processes underlying reasoning and memory. In both domains, he is working towards developing formal theories that are able to describe the computational processes on an individual level. In addition, he is interested in the development and implementation of computational methods and tools for psychology and other empirical disciplines.
http://singmann.org/

Kinga Morsanyi

Kinga Morsanyi

Junior

Kinga Morsanyi has a background in the development of reasoning skills in typical development and in special populations (in developmental dyscalculia and autism). She is particularly interested in reasoning heuristics, probabilistic reasoning, analogical reasoning, and how reasoning skills can be improved through training. Another line of her research concerns mathematical abilities and mathematical anxiety, and the contribution of reasoning skills to mathematics performance. She is also interested in how affec-tive states influence reasoning and maths abilities, as well as people’s decisions, and how reasoning and maths skills can be improved by training. Her work has been funded by grants from the ESRC, the Nuf-field Foundation, the Royal Society, the British Academy, and the Higher Education Academy Psychol-ogy Network.
https://pure.qub.ac.uk/portal/en/persons/kinga-morsanyi(898599ff-f105-44bc-ad3a-8194bb37c69b).html

keynotes_speaker_script
important-information-for-you

Location

How to access ICT2020

The Hotêl de Ville is easily accessible thanks to the extensive subway system of the city.

  • The closest subway station is the station Hôtel de Ville on Metro Lines 1 & 11.
  • The next closest station is Châtelet, on Metro Lines 1, 4, 7, 11 & 14 (5 minutes to the Hôtel de Ville on foot).
  • Finally, another close station is Châtelet – Les Halles, on Train Lines (RER) A, B and D (10 minutes to the Hôtel de Ville on foot).

Access Directions for further information.

Download the map of transport lines

We do not tolerate harassment of conference participants in any form. Harassment includes offensive verbal comments, deliberate intimidation, stalking, inappropriate physical contact, and unwelcome sexual attention. Participants asked to stop any harassing behavior are expected to comply immediately. If a participant engages in harassing behavior, the conference organizers may take any action they deem appropriate, including warning the offender or expulsion from the conference with no refund. If you are being harassed, notice that someone else is being harassed, or have any other concerns, please contact a member of conference staff immediately.

Credits for the website go to Olivier Masson & Baptiste Jacquet

Credits for the ICT-2020 logo go to Baptiste Baratgin

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